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Dude, Where’s My Car?

By 9th November 2011 No Comments

Dude, Where’s My Car is a comedy film directed by Danny Leiner, who has since gone on to direct “Harold and Kumar Get the Munchies”. The film stars Ashton Kutcher of popular prankster TV show “Punk’d” and Seann William Scott who was the infamous “Stifler” in the first three instalments of American Pie. Despite receiving terrible reviews from critics, it was welcomed with open arms by the public, and did very well at the box office, grossing approximately $55 million worldwide. Considering the film was fairly independent, it had a pretty small budget, and Kutcher and Scott weren’t famous back then, it did very well. Jesse (Ashton Kutcher) and Chester (Seann William Scott) got really wasted last night. The fridge is packed with pudding, their girlfriends – “The Twins” – are ticked off, and somehow Jesse’s car has disappeared. So the hapless stoner’s set out to find the car, which happens to have their girlfriends’ anniversary presents in it. But they soon discover that losing the car isn’t half the story. High school hottie Christie (Kristy Swanson) is mysteriously hot for Jesse, Chester is a favourite customer at the local topless club, and they owe a suitcase full of money to a transvestite stripper. On top of all that, they’re being pursued by a minivan full of geeks, horny “space babes” and a couple of “totally gay” Scandinavian dudes – all trying to find the “continuum transfunctioner,” the device that can save or destroy the universe… Dude, Where’s My Car is a very funny film that relies mainly on comedic talents of the two main stars rather than have an actual story worthy of laughs. However this isn’t a bad thing, Ashton Kutcher and Seann William Scott are hilarious actors who clearly thrive on improvisation opportunities, which this film clearly is. The plot is wafer thin, with the exception of some of the outrageously funny situations that the characters find themselves in. Although without Kutcher and Scott I personally believe that Dude, Where’s My Car would have gone straight to video, and would not have the cult following that it has today.